Twin Cities Sikh community opens temple doors

A small but growing Sikh community in the Twin Cities is opening its temple doors in Bloomington in the wake of the shootings in Milwaukee, reaching out to neighbors and also remaining vigilant to future attacks.
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In the wake of a shooting at a Sikh temple in the Milwaukee area that left seven dead, including the shooter, the Sikh Society of Minnesota will hold a prayer service Friday evening to honor the seven who died, MPR reports. Followers of the often-misunderstood Sikh faith are trying to educate their neighbors about who they are, while staying vigilant for other attacks, MPR says.

The deadly attack Sunday in Oak Creek, Wis., has pushed Minnesota’s 500-family Sikh community into the spotlight, Fridley Patch reports.

Until last year, the Sikh Society of Minnesota had a home in a former Fridley McDonald's, at 5831 University Ave. NE, and the temple still owns property at 5350 Monroe St. NE and has tentative plans to develop the property in the future, Patch says. Kehar Singh, the former president of the Sikh Society of Minnesota, said the temple decided to move to Bloomington instead of building on the 2.2-acre Monroe Street property, Fridley Patch reports.

The Associated Press has more about the shooter, a known white supremacist (with video).

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