U law profs: Loophole in health reform would let employers dump sickest workers on public

Two law professors at the University of Minnesota say a loophole in the federal health reform plan could leave the public caring for the sickest people and put the proposed online exchanges at financial risk. They tell MPR the law might make it possible for self-insured employers to create plans that aren't attractive to people with serious health needs, leaving them to seek coverage from a public insurance exchange.
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Two law professors at the University of Minnesota say a loophole in the federal health reform plan could leave the public caring for the sickest people and put the proposed online exchanges at financial risk. They tell MPR the law might make it possible for self-insured employers to create plans that aren't attractive to people with serious health needs, leaving them to seek coverage from a public insurance exchange.

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