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U of M computer scientists find cell phone hackers can track your location

Your cellular network sends messages from their towers to your phone. Hackers - or law enforcement - can use those messages to keep track of where you are. The U of M researchers say they've let cell companies know and have suggested changes.
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Your cellular network sends messages from their towers to your phone. Hackers - or law enforcement - can use those messages to keep track of where you are. The U of M researchers say they've let cell companies know and have suggested changes.

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