U of M issues call to arms for better flu vaccines

A University of Minnesota report says the modern-day flu vaccine -- while better than nothing -- does not offer Americans sufficient protection. U of M experts say the vaccine has not changed much since it was first introduced in the 1960's. They say better vaccines are in the early stages of research but it will take a coordinated effort similar to the Manhattan Project to bring those prospects to market.
Author:
Publish date:

A University of Minnesota report says the modern-day flu vaccine -- while better than nothing -- does not offer Americans sufficient protection. U of M experts say the vaccine has not changed much since it was first introduced in the 1960's. They say better vaccines are in the early stages of research but it will take a coordinated effort similar to the Manhattan Project to bring those prospects to market.

Next Up

Related

U of M study raises more concerns about flu at fairs

A University of Minnesota veterinarian, Dr. Jeff Bender, is releasing the results of his study and it comes with a warning for anyone planning to visit the Minnesota State Fair -- which starts one week from Thursday. Scientists found 19 percent of the 57 pigs tested at the Minnesota State Fair in 2009 had the H1N1 flu virus -- compared to none of the 47 samples the year before. Fair officials tell the Star Tribune they've stepped up precautions for both fairgoers and livestock.

U of M professor: Drugs aren't solution to kids' attention problems

A psychology professor from the University of Minnesota is making waves with an article in the Sunday New York Times. L. Alan Sroufe says medicating children is a misguided approach to treating attention disorders. "Putting children on drugs does nothing to change the conditions that derail their development in the first place," he writes.

Building a better beer? U of M scientist helps map barley genome

An international team that includes University of Minnesota scientist Gary Muehlbauer has mapped the genome of barley, one of the world's most important and genetically complex cereal crops, and a key beer ingredient. The researchers say the findings could lead to higher yields and a grain that can more easily handle climate change.