U of M: Michelle Obama speech written at lofty 12th grade level - Bring Me The News

U of M: Michelle Obama speech written at lofty 12th grade level

The University of Minnesota's Humphrey School of Public Affairs analyzed the speeches at the party conventions, looking at considerations such as sentence length and polysyllabic words. First Lady Michelle Obama's speech came in at a 12th grade level. That was by far the highest among presidential candidate's spouses since they started giving convention speeches 20 years ago. Higher than her husband's eighth-grade level State of the Union speeches, too.
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The University of Minnesota's Humphrey School of Public Affairs analyzed the speeches at this year's political conventions and found First Lady Michelle Obama's was written at a much higher grade level than most.

Her husband's State of the Union speeches have been written at an eighth grade level. And Ann Romney's speech the week before came in at the lowest grade level among presidential candidates' spouses since they became a convention fixture twenty years ago.

Do longer sentences and bigger words make for a better speech, though?

If you want to do your own side-by-side comparison, have at it.

Of course, when women take the stage the scrutiny of clothing goes up a couple of notches. Washington Post blogger Suzi Parker brings us up to speed on the flap over Michelle's dress and what it actually cost, before bemoaning the attention clothes get.

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