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U of M physicists might find Einstein was wrong

Einstein's theory of special relativity says nothing can move faster than the speed of light, but early research suggests that some subatomic particles actually do. Now scientists are trying to confirm that, and one of the few places on Earth where they can conduct such research is in a high-energy physics lab half a mile underground in the Soudan mine up north.
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Einstein's theory of special relativity says nothing can move faster than the speed of light, but early research suggests that some subatomic particles actually do. Now scientists are trying to confirm that, and one of the few places on Earth where they can conduct such research is in a high-energy physics lab half a mile underground in the Soudan mine up north.

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