U of M prof played role in solving Higgs boson puzzle

Roger Rusack, a longtime University of Minnesota physics professor, has been a part of the search for the elusive Higgs boson particle for two decades. He helped design, develop and tweak a critical particle detector within the massive, 17-mile-long Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland, the world's most powerful particle accelerator. His contribution, the electromagnetic calorimeter, measures the energies of photons.
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Roger Rusack, a longtime University of Minnesota physics professor, has been a part of the search for the elusive Higgs boson particle for two decades. He helped design, develop and tweak a critical particle detector within the massive, 17-mile-long Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, Switzerland, the world's most powerful particle accelerator. His contribution, the electromagnetic calorimeter, measures the energies of photons.

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