U of M researchers find flu vaccine less effective than thought - Bring Me The News

U of M researchers find flu vaccine less effective than thought

The researchers combed through 31 studies and concluded the flu vaccine is effective for 59 percent of healthy adults. They called that inadequate but still encouraged people to get the shots, saying it's the best protection available.
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The researchers combed through 31 studies and concluded the flu vaccine is effective for 59 percent of healthy adults. They called that inadequate but still encouraged people to get the shots, saying it's the best protection available.

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U of M issues call to arms for better flu vaccines

A University of Minnesota report says the modern-day flu vaccine -- while better than nothing -- does not offer Americans sufficient protection. U of M experts say the vaccine has not changed much since it was first introduced in the 1960's. They say better vaccines are in the early stages of research but it will take a coordinated effort similar to the Manhattan Project to bring those prospects to market.

Can rock music make you racist? Not exactly, says U of M researcher, but ...

The Daily Mail recently lit up the Internet with a story about a University of Minnesota research project. The headline: "Does listening to rock make you racist?" The professor behind the study says the headline was misleading, but the rest of the story captured her findings pretty well: "In a nutshell, we were testing the power of music to affect how people treat others. What we found was that music genre ... has a powerful effect on people's behavior," Prof. Heather LaMarre tells pop culture site Fuse.Tv.

U of M tests show high risk for heart attacks in patients who thought they were healthy

Researchers developed the screening tools 10 years ago, and results published recently suggest they're far more accurate than traditional heart screenings. The bad news: The Minnesota Daily says more than a third of the 2,000 people screened so far have been told they're at high risk for heart attacks when they thought they were healthy. The test uses ultrasound to visualize the heart and check for hardening in arteries.

U of M physicists might find Einstein was wrong

Einstein's theory of special relativity says nothing can move faster than the speed of light, but early research suggests that some subatomic particles actually do. Now scientists are trying to confirm that, and one of the few places on Earth where they can conduct such research is in a high-energy physics lab half a mile underground in the Soudan mine up north.

U of M researcher: Bulimia changes the brain

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