U of M researchers join effort to help cold-climate wine industry thrive - Bring Me The News

U of M researchers join effort to help cold-climate wine industry thrive

A grant from the federal Agriculture Department is helping researchers in cold-climate states look at ways they can help develop the region's wine industry. The University of Minnesota says the state has more than three dozen wineries and the industry is growing fast.
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A grant from the federal Agriculture Department is helping researchers in cold-climate states look at ways they can help develop the region's wine industry. The University of Minnesota says the state has more than three dozen wineries and the industry is growing fast.

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