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U of M study: Dialysis 3 times a week might not be enough

U researchers say cleansing the blood of toxins three times a week may not be enough. Their study found heart attacks and hospitalizations are much higher during the two-day interval between treatments than at other times.
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U researchers say cleansing the blood of toxins three times a week may not be enough. Their study found heart attacks and hospitalizations are much higher during the two-day interval between treatments than at other times.

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