U of M study finds when men are scarce women's career goals get more ambitious

A study co-authored by a University of Minnesota researcher finds that when men are in short supply, women are more likely to pursue high-paying careers and postpone having children. This breifcase-over-baby tendency seems to be picking up steam. Women outnumber men at most colleges and earn 60 percent of the country's master's degrees.
Author:
Updated:
Original:

A study co-authored by a University of Minnesota researcher finds that when men are in short supply, women are more likely to pursue high-paying careers and postpone having children. This breifcase-over-baby tendency seems to be picking up steam. Women outnumber men at most colleges and earn 60 percent of the country's master's degrees.

Next Up

ambulance

Man, 23, killed in single-vehicle wreck near St. Cloud

The crash happened on Highway 10 around 11:30 a.m.

Byron Buxton

Buxton returns, Twins get another victory in Texas

Buxton missed 39 games with a hip strain.

20210618_152429

Homicide in Robbinsdale leads to 10-hour standoff in Brooklyn Center

The suspect was at a residence in Brooklyn Center.

fireworks

St. Paul will not put on fireworks display this year, citing budget concerns

Minneapolis and Stillwater have also canceled their displays this year due to logistical challenges.

minneapolis police

5 people shot overnight in Dinkytown, investigation underway

It happened in the area of 14th Ave SE and 4th St SE.

Luis Arraez

Arráez's triple gives Twins rare extra-inning victory

The Twins scored three runs in the 10th to take Friday's opener.

court gavel

St. Cloud man sentenced after traveling to meet minor he solicited online

Nathan Paul Grondahl learned his fate in a federal court this week.

Related

U study: Women more likely to pursue high-paying career when men are scarce

Researchers at the University of Minnesota say they've found evidence that, when potential mates are harder to find, women are more likely to focus on getting a high-powered job, delay having children and have fewer kids when they do start families. "A scarcity of men leads women to invest in their careers because they realize it will be difficult to settle down and start a family," said marketing professor and study co-author.

U study: When women are scarce, men are more impulsive

New research from the Carlson School of Business is the latest to show how human behavior can be reflexive and subconscious, rather than logical and thought-out. Researchers say that when men see fewer women around, they're more likely to act impulsively, borrow more money and save less.

U of M study finds a 'brain gain' in rural Minnesota

Reports of the demise of rural Minnesota seem to be greatly exaggerated. While it's true that college-aged residents are leaving rural counties, research by a U of M sociologist finds people in their 30s and 40s and migrating into rural areas. And bringing educational degrees and earning power with them.

Study: Women paid 20 percent less than men in Minnesota

A new study prepared by the Washington-based National Partnership for Women & Families finds that Minnesota women earn 80 cents per every dollar men in the state are paid, the Star Tribune reports. The findings were made in an analysis of data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

U of M study raises more concerns about flu at fairs

A University of Minnesota veterinarian, Dr. Jeff Bender, is releasing the results of his study and it comes with a warning for anyone planning to visit the Minnesota State Fair -- which starts one week from Thursday. Scientists found 19 percent of the 57 pigs tested at the Minnesota State Fair in 2009 had the H1N1 flu virus -- compared to none of the 47 samples the year before. Fair officials tell the Star Tribune they've stepped up precautions for both fairgoers and livestock.