U of M study: Youth sports not enough to curb childhood obesity - Bring Me The News

U of M study: Youth sports not enough to curb childhood obesity

The University of Minnesota says nearly half of overweight adolescents already play organized sports. Researchers behind the study say junk food is the culprit.
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The University of Minnesota says nearly half of overweight adolescents already play organized sports. Researchers behind the study say junk food is the culprit.

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