U of M tests show high risk for heart attacks in patients who thought they were healthy - Bring Me The News

U of M tests show high risk for heart attacks in patients who thought they were healthy

Researchers developed the screening tools 10 years ago, and results published recently suggest they're far more accurate than traditional heart screenings. The bad news: The Minnesota Daily says more than a third of the 2,000 people screened so far have been told they're at high risk for heart attacks when they thought they were healthy. The test uses ultrasound to visualize the heart and check for hardening in arteries.
Author:
Publish date:

Researchers developed the screening tools 10 years ago, and results published recently suggest they're far more accurate than traditional heart screenings. The bad news: The Minnesota Daily says more than a third of the 2,000 people screened so far have been told they're at high risk for heart attacks when they thought they were healthy. The test uses ultrasound to visualize the heart and check for hardening in arteries.

Next Up

Related

Joel Maturi's compensation package puts U of M's future state funding at risk

Two legislators who serve on higher education committees warn school leaders Maturi's pay could influence future budget decisions. Maturi will transition to his new role as a special assistant to university President Eric Kaler in July. The soon to be former athletic director will still earn more than $468,000 -- his same base salary plus benefits.

SweeTango lawsuit settles in U of M's favor

The Associated Press reports the suit will be dismissed. While the decision upholds the school's right to be selective with SweeTango licenses -- it will also makes more SweeTango trees available to more orchards.