U of M tests show high risk for heart attacks in patients who thought they were healthy

Researchers developed the screening tools 10 years ago, and results published recently suggest they're far more accurate than traditional heart screenings. The bad news: The Minnesota Daily says more than a third of the 2,000 people screened so far have been told they're at high risk for heart attacks when they thought they were healthy. The test uses ultrasound to visualize the heart and check for hardening in arteries.
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Researchers developed the screening tools 10 years ago, and results published recently suggest they're far more accurate than traditional heart screenings. The bad news: The Minnesota Daily says more than a third of the 2,000 people screened so far have been told they're at high risk for heart attacks when they thought they were healthy. The test uses ultrasound to visualize the heart and check for hardening in arteries.

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