U study: Dietary supplements may increase risk of death

Researchers at the University of Minnesota have found evidence that dietary supplements can do more harm than good.
Author:
Updated:
Original:

Researchers at the University of Minnesota have found evidence that dietary supplements can do more harm than good.

Next Up

Screen Shot 2020-11-25 at 7.34.43 AM

Watch: Drunk squirrel in Minnesota captures the world's attention

The squirrel was immediately cut off after nearly tipping over.

Screen Shot 2020-11-25 at 7.15.09 PM

Small town gym refusing to close facing lawsuit from attorney general

The gym is facing a lawsuit and a temporary restraining order to halt their operations.

credit card, payment

Money Gal Coaching: Bouncing back after living your best life

Kelly Blodgett started Money Gal Coaching after paying down nearly $50K in debt in 18 months.

flickr-mall-of-america-mitchell-hirsch-march-2019

When do stores open on Black Friday this year?

Many major retailers will be open Black Friday, some for extended hours.

police tape, crime scene

Man found dead outside home near Cass Lake

The man was reportedly shot outside the property.

Minnesota_Welcome_Sign_-_Minnesota_Welcomes_You_-_Taylors_Falls_(28269804891)

Gov. Walz announces $1M in grants to boost Minnesota tourism

The money will be used for marketing efforts to attract people to Minnesota's hard-hit tourist spots.

coronavirus, ICU

Nov. 25 COVID-19 update: 72 deaths ties Minnesota's single-day high

A COVID-19 update will not be provided on Thanksgiving Day.

Texa-Tonka

Revival to open its fourth Twin Cities location

The fried chicken and smoked meat maestros are moving to St. Louis Park.

Duluth and Case Recreation Center

St. Paul to open two extra temporary shelters for homeless people

Mayor Melvin Carter announced the new shelters will be opened in the event of excess demand.

vote, election

Minnesota once again had the highest election turnout in the country

Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, a record percentage of voters also sent in absentee ballots.

Related

U study: Women more likely to pursue high-paying career when men are scarce

Researchers at the University of Minnesota say they've found evidence that, when potential mates are harder to find, women are more likely to focus on getting a high-powered job, delay having children and have fewer kids when they do start families. "A scarcity of men leads women to invest in their careers because they realize it will be difficult to settle down and start a family," said marketing professor and study co-author.

Study: Coffee lowers depression risk in women

Researchers at Harvard found women who drink two to three cups of caffeinated coffee every day lower their risk of depression by 15 percent. If you drink four or more cups, your risk drops by 20 percent.

Study suggests PFCs may impair children's immune systems

Minnesota health officials are calling for more research after a study revealed a possible link between exposure to the chemicals and impaired immune systems in children. The study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, found evidence that vaccines are less effective for children with elevated levels of PFCs.

U of M tests show high risk for heart attacks in patients who thought they were healthy

Researchers developed the screening tools 10 years ago, and results published recently suggest they're far more accurate than traditional heart screenings. The bad news: The Minnesota Daily says more than a third of the 2,000 people screened so far have been told they're at high risk for heart attacks when they thought they were healthy. The test uses ultrasound to visualize the heart and check for hardening in arteries.

Study: More Iron Range mesothelioma deaths found, bringing total to 82

The Duluth News Tribune reports state health officials found more than a dozen additional cases by checking death records in other states for former Iron Range residents who moved out of Minnesota.

U of M study: Dialysis 3 times a week might not be enough

U researchers say cleansing the blood of toxins three times a week may not be enough. Their study found heart attacks and hospitalizations are much higher during the two-day interval between treatments than at other times.

Study: Early trauma can lower child's IQ

Maltreatment or even witnessing family violence can cause cognitive harm on par with lead exposure, according to research from the University of Minnesota and Boston Children's Hospital. The study suggests children younger than 2 are the most vulnerable.