U study: Dietary supplements may increase risk of death - Bring Me The News

U study: Dietary supplements may increase risk of death

Researchers at the University of Minnesota have found evidence that dietary supplements can do more harm than good.
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Researchers at the University of Minnesota have found evidence that dietary supplements can do more harm than good.

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