U study: When women are scarce, men are more impulsive

New research from the Carlson School of Business is the latest to show how human behavior can be reflexive and subconscious, rather than logical and thought-out. Researchers say that when men see fewer women around, they're more likely to act impulsively, borrow more money and save less.
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U study: Women more likely to pursue high-paying career when men are scarce

Researchers at the University of Minnesota say they've found evidence that, when potential mates are harder to find, women are more likely to focus on getting a high-powered job, delay having children and have fewer kids when they do start families. "A scarcity of men leads women to invest in their careers because they realize it will be difficult to settle down and start a family," said marketing professor and study co-author.

U of M study finds when men are scarce women's career goals get more ambitious

A study co-authored by a University of Minnesota researcher finds that when men are in short supply, women are more likely to pursue high-paying careers and postpone having children. This breifcase-over-baby tendency seems to be picking up steam. Women outnumber men at most colleges and earn 60 percent of the country's master's degrees.

'U' study aims to learn more about post-deployment families

More than 120 recently deployed military families are part of a groundbreaking U of M study called ADAPT. It aims to make the transition back home after military deployment easier. Researchers observe parents and their children to try and understand deployment stress. At the same time, researchers test parenting techniques on the families.

U of M study raises more concerns about flu at fairs

A University of Minnesota veterinarian, Dr. Jeff Bender, is releasing the results of his study and it comes with a warning for anyone planning to visit the Minnesota State Fair -- which starts one week from Thursday. Scientists found 19 percent of the 57 pigs tested at the Minnesota State Fair in 2009 had the H1N1 flu virus -- compared to none of the 47 samples the year before. Fair officials tell the Star Tribune they've stepped up precautions for both fairgoers and livestock.

U of M study finds a 'brain gain' in rural Minnesota

Reports of the demise of rural Minnesota seem to be greatly exaggerated. While it's true that college-aged residents are leaving rural counties, research by a U of M sociologist finds people in their 30s and 40s and migrating into rural areas. And bringing educational degrees and earning power with them.

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U study finds decrease in teenage eating disorders

Fewer teenage girls are suffering with eating disorders, according to new research from the University of Minnesota. But the same study finds an increase in obesity among minority teenage boys.