U study: Women more likely to pursue high-paying career when men are scarce

Researchers at the University of Minnesota say they've found evidence that, when potential mates are harder to find, women are more likely to focus on getting a high-powered job, delay having children and have fewer kids when they do start families. "A scarcity of men leads women to invest in their careers because they realize it will be difficult to settle down and start a family," said marketing professor and study co-author.
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Researchers at the University of Minnesota say they've found evidence that, when potential mates are harder to find, women are more likely to focus on getting a high-powered job, delay having children and have fewer kids when they do start families. "A scarcity of men leads women to invest in their careers because they realize it will be difficult to settle down and start a family," said marketing professor and study co-author.

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