Uber will stop tracking you after you've been dropped off

The ride-sharing service had a change of heart about the controversial feature.
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Uber has scrapped the creepy feature that tracks your phone's location even after you've finished your ride.

The decision to remove the feature from the app was reported by Reuters on Tuesday and follows "heavy" criticism leveled at the ride-sharing company. It allowed Uber to track riders for up to five minutes after their trip ended.

The change, made to improve its poor reputation for customer privacy, will mean users will only be sharing their location data while using the app, and it will first be rolled out to iPhone users next week.

The tracking feature when Uber users were given the option of having their location "always" tracked or "never." If they chose the latter, it meant having to manually input their pickup and drop-off locations.

If they chose "always," the 5-minute tracking rule came into play. TechCrunch notes it proved hugely controversial after some Uber employees used it to stalk ex-girlfriends and celebrities, and the company "spied" on reporters' trips.

The move to scrap the feature has been welcomed by U.S. Sen. Al Franken, a staunch data privacy crusader, who wrote to Uber after learning of the controversial app feature.

On Tuesday he commented on the most decision to nix the feature.

"I'm glad to see that Uber has heeded my call and reinstated a customer's ability to limit the collection of location data to only when the app is actually in use and that the company has chosen to end post-trip tracking," he said in a statement sent to GoMN. "I’m hopeful that this announcement is the first step in Uber’s renewed commitment to the privacy and security of its users," he added.

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