'Uncharted waters' for Minn. day care workers with union vote looming

In two weeks, child care workers will vote on whether or not to unionize. But a meeting Monday revealed many unanswered questions for the state's 11,000 day care providers.
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In two weeks, child care workers will vote on whether or not to unionize. But a meeting Monday revealed many unanswered questions for the state's 11,000 day care providers.

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Group of day care providers sues to block union vote

A group of child care providers opposed to an effort to unionize the business are suing. They claim Gov. Dayton overstepped his authority in signing an executive order authorizing child-care workers to vote on whether to form a union.

Some day care providers worry union would take away their voice

One child care provider who has joined a lawsuit to block a vote to unionize tells Forum Communications' reporter Don Davis that she worries a union would take over all negotiations with state officials, leaving her with no voice of her own. But union supporters say the move to stop the vote is just a ploy by "cheap-labor conservatives" and that unionization would provide better pay and benefits for workers in the industry.

Foes of day care union take fight to federal court

Those who disagree with a move to unionize the state's child care workers will ask a federal judge to rule on Gov. Dayton's executive order authorizing a union vote. Opponents say Dayton's order may violate their First Amendment

Dayton won't keep pushing for child care union vote

The Ramsey County judge who blocked a unionization vote by child care workers ruled that Governor Dayton had exceeded his authority by ordering the vote without involving the Legislature. Dayton says he disagrees with the ruling but has decided against an appeal.

Legislative hearing applies heat to day care union debate

Supporters on both sides of the union issue packed a hearing in St. Paul to argue allowing home child care workers to organize. Opponents of the idea say it will change the profession for the worse and make it harder for employers. Supporters say a union will help workers get a wage that matches their skills.