Urban farmers fear city rules will prune profits

Urban farmers are now tending 400 community gardens on lots around the metro. Urban farming has gotten so popular that many cities, including St. Paul, are scrambling to regulate the plots. Commercial gardeners fret that new rules could bury their businesses.
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Urban farmers are now tending 400 community gardens on lots around the metro. Urban farming has gotten so popular that many cities, including St. Paul, are scrambling to regulate the plots. Commercial gardeners fret that new rules could bury their businesses.

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