Minn. will have nation's best corn crop, USDA says - Bring Me The News

Minn. will have nation's best corn crop, USDA says

The rest of the country will be looking to Minnesota to help fill its corn bins this fall. A new crop estimate from the USDA says the national corn harvest will be 13 percent smaller than last year. But up here where the drought is not as devastating, we're expecting to bring in 7 percent more than last year. And the sugar beet forecast is up a whopping 43 percent.
Author:
Publish date:

In a summer of drought across the nation's midsection, Minnesota is a bright spot on the harvest map. A new federal estimate predicts the corn harvest here will be seven percent larger than last year, while nationwide it will be 13 percent smaller. The dry weather means the per-acre yields will be lower, but the number of acres planted this spring was a record both in the state and nationally.

The USDA report actually forecasts a smaller crop loss than markets had feared. That's spawned hope - especially among livestock farmers - that soaring corn prices will stabilize.

Minnesota's harvest is already underway, weeks earlier than usual thanks to the mild spring weather that gave farmers an early start.

Meanwhile, the federal ag policy that guides many of the decisions growers make expires at the end of the month. Minnesota's Collin Peterson, the ranking Democrat on the House Agriculture Committee, spoke at a rally urging the House to approve a new farm bill. The Senate passed a new bill in June.

Next Up

Related

Minn. corn farmers projected to harvest record crop

Minnesota's cornfields will average 168 bushels an acre this year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The Pioneer Press reports this would be Minnesota's largest corn crop in state history and make the state the second largest corn producer in the country -- only trailing Iowa.

Farmers making progress on early corn and soybean harvests

It's only mid-September, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture says 12 percent of Minnesota's corn crop is already harvested. The Pioneer Press notes that is roughly three weeks earlier than last year. The soybean harvest is also well ahead of the five-year average with 16 percent complete.

High crop prices attracting new blood to farming

Record high prices for corn and soybeans have more Minnesotans looking to give farming a try. But the toughest part of getting started is finding an affordable piece of land. The demand for farmland is pushing up rents, which have risen more than 50 percent in five years.

U.S. corn planting may be most since 1937, seeds in short supply

An official with Minnesota's Ag Department says farmers should be able to find some type of corn seed to plant this spring, but the most popular varieties may not be available. High prices have farmers all over the country boosting corn acreage. Minnesota expects about a ten percent increase over last year.