USDA: Last month's frost did less crop damage than first thought

Officials say this year's corn and soybean yields remain unchanged, despite the frost. But grains may be another story -- the full damage of the frost may not be known until after the fall harvest is complete.
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Officials say this year's corn and soybean yields remain unchanged, despite the frost. But grains may be another story -- the full damage of the frost may not be known until after the fall harvest is complete.

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