'Vote No Twice' campaign targets 2 amendments, elicits chuckles - Bring Me The News

'Vote No Twice' campaign targets 2 amendments, elicits chuckles

The grassroots campaign behind "Vote No Twice" lawn signs, launched by Minneapolis graphic designer Emily Shaffer, encourages voters to reject two very different ballot measures, one that would ban gay marriage and one that would require voters to bring a photo ID to the polls, MPR reports. But others find the slogan amusing – read another way, the message suggests that people vote more than once.
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The grassroots campaign behind "Vote No Twice" lawn signs, launched by Minneapolis graphic designer Emily Shaffer, encourages voters to reject two very different ballot measures, one that would ban gay marriage and one that would require voters to bring a photo ID to the polls, MPR reports. But others find the slogan amusing – read another way, the message suggests that people vote more than once.

The grassroots campaign is not affiliated with the two separate organized campaigns – Minnesotans United for All Families and Our Vote, Our Future – that are working to defeat the amendments, MPR says. Those two organizations have made no efforts to link their campaigns.

Likely voters seem to be evenly split on the marriage amendment, according to a new Star Tribune poll. Campaigns on both sides have begun a final push with just over a week to Election Day, MPR says.

The poll also shows that the voter ID measure is expected to pass. The Star Tribune also examines to what extent voter fraud is even an issue.

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Marriage amendment allies, foes target black voters

Black voters in Minnesota are the latest audience sought by opponents and supporters of marriage amendment, the Star Tribune reports. The president of the national NAACP was in the state Monday to urge black voters to reject the ballot measure that would ban gay marriage. Church leaders are divided.

Minnesotans evenly split on marriage amendment

The results of a new KSTP/SurveyUSA poll show 46 percent of voters opposed to a ballot measure that would ban gay marriage in Minnesota, with 47 percent in favor of it. The gap has narrowed – a September survey said 43 percent would vote no and 50 percent yes.

Cash floods into amendment campaigns

In just the last three days, nearly $1 million has been funneled into the campaigns on both sides of the two constitutional amendments on Minnesota's Election Day ballot, the Star Tribune reports. Among the donations, the Minnesota Family Council gave $500,000 to the effort supporting the amendment that would effectively ban gay marriage.

New poll shows Minnesotans evenly divided on both amendments

The marriage and voter ID amendments need the support of a majority of Minnesotans who vote in November to become part of the state Constitution. The latest poll shows the marriage amendment supported by 49 percent of respondents, while 51 percent back the voter ID measure.

Marriage amendment combatants raise more than $15M

The battle over the marriage amendment may be the most expensive fight ever in Minnesota over a ballot initiative, the Star Tribune reports. Even actor Brad Pitt has donated money. Opponents of the measure raised more than $10 million, and supporters raised about $5 million. Supporters of the other ballot measure, a constitutional amendment that would require voters to bring a photo ID to the polls, raised about $1.5 million, and opponents raked in $2.6 million.

Stunner: Voter ID amendment fails

In a shocking upset, the voter ID amendment has failed, and by a sizable margin. With 98 percent of precincts reporting, the "no" votes led by nearly 8 percentage points, MPR says. The measure would have amended the state constitution to require voters to bring photo IDs to the polls.

Oops: some show up at primary to vote on marriage amendment

Minnesotans who came to the polls on primary day to vote for or against the proposed Constitutional amendments were disappointed. The amendments were not on the ballot. The marriage and voter ID questions don't come up for a vote until the general election in November. An election official says the mistake is not surprising, with all the attention paid to the amendments.