Voter ID amendment clears first hurdle in state Senate

The Senate Local Government and Elections Committee passed the voter ID bill on a party-line vote, with DFLers opposing it. The measure has several more stops before it would appear on the November ballot as a proposed Constitutional amendment.
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The Senate Local Government and Elections Committee passed the voter ID bill on a party-line vote, with DFLers opposing it. The measure has several more stops before it would appear on the November ballot as a proposed Constitutional amendment.

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Stunner: Voter ID amendment fails

In a shocking upset, the voter ID amendment has failed, and by a sizable margin. With 98 percent of precincts reporting, the "no" votes led by nearly 8 percentage points, MPR says. The measure would have amended the state constitution to require voters to bring photo IDs to the polls.

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The measure advanced through a House committee on a party-line vote Monday. If the House and Senate pass the proposal, then voters in the November election will decide whether to amend the state constitution to require that all would-be voters present a photo ID before they cast a ballot.

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A group opposed to the Voter ID Constitutional amendment Minnesotans will vote on in November estimates changes required by the amendment would cost state and local governments at least $33 million and possibly twice that amount. The Center For Election Integrity Minnesota says individual Minnesotans could spend a similar amount assembling the documents needed to qualify for state-issued IDs.

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The proposed referendum on whether a photo ID should be required to vote cleared its last Senate committee and is scheduled for a floor debate Friday afternoon. The Minnesota House debated the measure for nine hours before approving it early Wednesday morning.

Voter ID amendment headed for November ballot

Minnesotans will vote this fall on a Constitutional amendment that would make a photo ID a requirement to vote. The Republican-backed measure passed the Legislature on party-line votes. Now supporters and critics of the change will ramp up campaigns to influence the public.

First Capitol hearing on voter ID measure brings out critics

Students and an employee of the Secretary of State's office were among the opponents of an idea to require an identification card to vote. Critics say it would deter some voters. The Legislature's Republican majority likes the idea and hopes to put it on the November ballot as a Constitutional amendment.