Voter ID group changes graphic criticized as racist - Bring Me The News

Voter ID group changes graphic criticized as racist

A group promoting picture IDs at the polls switched out an illustration called racist by critics. The Minnesota Majority substituted a woman in a Canadian t-shirt and a cartoon white man in prison garb for the previous illustration that included a black man in prison stripes and a person wearing a Mariachi outfit.
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A group promoting picture IDs at the polls switched out an illustration called racist by critics. The Minnesota Majority substituted a woman in a Canadian t-shirt and a cartoon white man in prison garb for the previous illustration that included a black man in prison stripes and a person wearing a Mariachi outfit.

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