Voters see political signs at church polling places, reports say - Bring Me The News

Voters see political signs at church polling places, reports say

Voters say political signs and messages were seen Tuesday morning at churches serving as polling places. MPR reports a banner read "Strengthen Marriage, don’t redefine it" at Saint John Vianney in South St. Paul just outside the voter entrance.
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Voters say political signs and messages were seen Tuesday morning at churches serving as polling places.

MPR reports a banner read "Strengthen Marriage, don’t redefine it" at Saint John Vianney in South St. Paul just outside the voter entrance.

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A church official told the public radio station the sign was later removed.

The Star Tribune says a prayer on Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis letterhead was posted near the polling location at St. Joseph's Church in West St. Paul.

It asks God to "Grant to us all the gift of courage to proclaim and defend your plan for marriage, which is the union of one man and one woman in a lifelong, exclusive relationship of loving trust, compassion, and generosity, open to the conception of children."

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The Pioneer Press says the the prayer posted in a display case was removed within a couple of hours of it being reported. A spokesman for the Archdiocese calls the incident a "simple oversight."

According to Minnesota Statute, a person may not display campaign materials within 100 feet of a polling place.

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