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Watch: Minnesota-born VP candidate has an unusual skill for a politician

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First the saxophone, now a harmonica?

On Friday Clinton announced Tim Kaine – a U.S. senator from Virginia – as her vice presidential pick. And although he didn’t grow up in Minnesota, he was born in St. Paul.

He is a relatively unknown candidate on the national scale (you can read more about him here) but he does possess an unusual skill for a politician: he plays a mean harmonica.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PzHcX_5UXj8

It might come in handy considering how many media outlets consider him to be a boringchoice (including himself).

While it certainly doesn't qualify him for any office, his harmonica chops might make his debate with Donald Trump's number two Mike Pence (also relatively unknown) a little more interesting.

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