Welcome to the 'heat dome': It's going to be really hot next week - Bring Me The News

Welcome to the 'heat dome': It's going to be really hot next week

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Enjoy the cooler weather while it lasts – next week is going to be hot.

Weather officials are predicting a heat dome over much of the central United States, including Minnesota, the Washington Post says, thanks to a "huge" area of high pressure from the desert southwest that's forecast to settle in next week.

The paper says this could bring the "most significant heat wave of the summer" to the majority of the country, with temperatures ranging from the 90s to over 100 degrees.

The National Weather Service's extended outlook shows the majority of Minnesota has an 80-90 percent chance of seeing above-average temperatures from July 19-23 (see map below).

 (Photo: National Weather Service)

(Photo: National Weather Service)

After cooler temperatures in the 60s and lower 70s Thursday, temperatures will slowly climb into the 80s this weekend, the National Weather Service's website shows.

Then get ready for the heat. The National Weather Service says it looks like temperatures will "soar" into the 90s – and maybe even pass the century mark – by the end of next week. 

https://twitter.com/NWSTwinCities/status/753549098054250496

Expect a lot of humidity, too. The National Weather Service says some weather models are showing dew points reaching as high as the upper 70s to lower 80s. A dew point over 65 is when things start to become "oppressive" and there will be lots of moisture in the air, the weather service notes.

We're ready for you, heat.

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Be careful of heat-related illnesses

The Weather Channel says Minneapolis could see heat indices above 100 degrees next week, which could put people at risk of heat-related illnesses if they're not careful.

The National Weather Service has a chart (see below) which shows the heat index for a specific temperature and relative humidity, or you use this calculator to figure out the heat index using dew point. (Confused about the difference between relative humidity and dew point? Boston.com has a good explainer.)

https://twitter.com/NWS/status/753580061941387264

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