Where's the snow? Scientist says 'Arctic Oscillation' might be culprit - Bring Me The News

Where's the snow? Scientist says 'Arctic Oscillation' might be culprit

Earlier this year we heard doomsday reports of dreadful temperatures and deep snow. How could forecasts be so far off? One reason could be a phenomenon know as "Arctic Oscillation," which can't be predicted more than two weeks out. One scientist says high-pressure far up north has trapped the cold there and that we can expect the mild temperatures to continue ... for at least two more weeks.
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Earlier this year we heard doomsday reports of dreadful temperatures and deep snow. How could forecasts be so far off? One reason could be a phenomenon know as "Arctic Oscillation," which can't be predicted more than two weeks out. One scientist says high-pressure far up north has trapped the cold there and that we can expect the mild temperatures to continue ... for at least two more weeks.

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