Updated:
Original:

Who needs low-wage manufacturing jobs? Maybe we do

The CEO of a Minneapolis company says letting low-wage jobs drift overseas could be a slippery slope. Patrick McHale of Graco Inc. told a manufacturing conference in Bloomington companies that provide low-skill jobs today often develop more sophisticated work. McHale called it a red flag that countries taking manufacturing jobs from the U.S. are also developing middle classes.
Author:

The CEO of a Minneapolis company told a conference of manufacturers in Bloomington that letting low-wage jobs drift overseas could be a trap. Patrick McHale of Graco Inc. says companies that provide low-skill jobs have incentive to develop more sophisticated work. McHale considers it a red flag that countries that've taken manufacturing jobs from the U.S. are now building middle classes.

Amid growing concerns about outsourcing, the Associated Press looked at what the presidential candidates have to say about the issue.

But Forbes last week reported a consulting firm's recent analysis is inspiring hope for the "reshoring" of millions of jobs from China. Big manufacturers including Lockheed Martin and General Electric have rolled out a plan to train military veterans to fill new jobs and hope other companies will join them.

Meanwhile, the National Association of Manufacturers on its page of interesting facts offers the reminder that the U.S. still makes more stuff than any other country.

Earlier this month Reuters looked at the issue and spoke with a manufacturer whose company is adding to its payroll:

Next Up

WIkimedia Commons - Frey April 20, 2021

Frey backs creation of Dept. of Public Safety, removal of police staffing minimums

He is in favor of removing police staffing minimums from the city charter – which this November's ballot question would also do.

Foreman tl - Flug-Presley tr - Sturm bl - Pettus br - Go Fund Me and Facebook

St. Paul PD takes over quadruple killing probe after it emerged they died in Minnesota

A "thorough investigation" reveled where the four Minnesotans were killed.

superior national forest

Highway 1 reopens as Greenwood Fire is 80% contained

The highway has been closed for about a month.

covid, vaccine

Minnesota's COVID-19 update for Monday, September 20

Data in Monday reports includes the past Friday, not the weekend. Weekend data is released on Tuesdays.

ATV

Driver killed in ATV rollover crash north of Alexandria

The crash occurred in Douglas County Sunday evening.

Related

Low wages dominate recovery in Minnesota, U.S.

A Star Tribune analysis of state data found nearly 36 percent of today's job openings pay $10 an hour or less. The Minneapolis-based newspaper also says the number of positions that pay $10 to $25 per hour has dropped more than 20 percent compared to a decade ago.

144 jobs to be lost as ADC closes Shakopee manufacturing plant

The owner of ADC Telecommunications has told employees that it will close its Shakopee manufacturing division, the Shakopee Valley News reports. Another 230 marketing, sales and management jobs will remain in the company's Telecom Networks division.

Online job postings inch up in Minnesota

There were about 100 more online job postings in Minnesota this month compared to September, according to the Conference Board. Minnesota's chief labor market analyst tells MPR that online job postings have consistently been stronger in Minnesota, perhaps because "employers in Minnesota are adapting to that technology more rapidly."

Job openings in greater Minnesota up but hours, wages lacking

The number of jobs available in Minnesota counties outside the Twin Cities area is at an eight-year high. But some analysts are serving up a grain of salt with that seemingly cheery news. The Jobs Now Coalition notes that barely half the jobs are full-time and the median hourly wage is barely ten dollars -- not quite enough to live on.

Nearly half of Minnesota manufacturers have jobs but no one qualified to fill them

A new survey of manufacturers shows the biggest shortages are in skilled production, followed by scientists and engineers. Officials say the lack of skilled workers could hurt the state’s economic growth if manufacturers can’t ramp up production.