Why is Fort Snelling primarily a stone structure?

On Sept. 10, 1820, Col. Josiah Snelling laid the cornerstone on what would eventually be known as Fort Snelling. Why was it a stone fort as opposed to a wooden fort? A) Because of a shortage of wood. B) Stone was cheaper. C) Termites were abundant. For the answer, click on the headline above...
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 A) Snelling had chosen to build a stone fort rather than the typical wooden structure, in part because there was not enough wood available in the immediate area, and -- in part -- because the fort was to sit on a limestone bluff.

 Photo courtesy: Minnesota Historical Society

Photo courtesy: Minnesota Historical Society

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