Wildfire could mean even longer waits for some moose hunters - Bring Me The News

Wildfire could mean even longer waits for some moose hunters

Hunters already wait years for a permit. Now the fire has scattered the animals and changed the landscape. One DNR official tells the Pioneer Press the fire is "a game-changer."
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Hunters already wait years for a permit. Now the fire has scattered the animals and changed the landscape. One DNR official tells the Pioneer Press the fire is "a game-changer."

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DNR warns of wildfire dangers

The DNR has is urging people to be careful with outdoor fires and requiring them to obtain a permit before burning brush because of unseasonably dry conditions. A fire on Monday in Polk County burned 750 acres of woods and land. Permits are available from local fire wardens or the DNR.

DNR further limits moose hunt

The DNR is closing two zones to moose hunters but will allow limited bull-hunting in others. The agency has been reviewing the rules as the moose population continues to fall. The state is issuing fewer than 90 permits this year.

Even after the snow, wildfires burn in northwestern MN

Last week's snowfall helped firefighters, but was not enough to extinguish several blazes burning in northwestern Minnesota. The largest is a fire near Red Lake that has burned more than 38 square miles and is about 30 percent contained.

Minnesota without moose? Expert says it looks that way

Bullwinkle Moose hailed from Frostbite Falls, Minnesota, but his species may become just a memory in the state. A DNR aerial survey shows northeastern Minnesota has already lost half its moose. Scientists don't know what's causing the animals to die off. The DNR doubts there's anything the state can do.

Loose moose turns heads in southern Minnesota

A moose, far astray from its north woods Minnesota habitat, has been plodding around the southern part of the state. It was recently spotted near Winthrop, roughly 80 miles southwest of the Twin Cities, the Mankato Free Press reports. “Generally, it’s young bulls who do this," a DNR biologist said. "They just have a lot of wander in them.”

Leaves hang on longer, residents scramble before the snow

The state DNR tells the Star Tribune lingering mild weather caused more leaves to fall 10 days to two weeks later than normal. Now, with the prospect of accumulating snow on the way, Minnesota residents are scrambling to scoop up a flurry of leaves.