Will Minnesota's new school assessments be an improvement over No Child Left Behind? - Bring Me The News

Will Minnesota's new school assessments be an improvement over No Child Left Behind?

The state has developed new ways to measure school performance if a requested waiver from No Child Left Behind is approved. The Education Commissioner thinks they'll be fairer and more accurate. A state business leader thinks they'll "destroy the accountability system for schools."
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The state has developed new ways to measure school performance if a requested waiver from No Child Left Behind is approved. The Education Commissioner thinks they'll be fairer and more accurate. A state business leader thinks they'll "destroy the accountability system for schools."

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Minnesota to renew pursuit of No Child Left Behind waiver

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