Winter is coming: Temps drop, rain turns to snow - Bring Me The News

Winter is coming: Temps drop, rain turns to snow

The Twin Cities could get nearly an inch of rain Thursday as temperatures drop during the day, leaving the possibility for a little slush and snow, but no accumulation. It was already snowing early Thursday in western parts of the state as the cold front moves in. Areas in the northern part of the state could get 2-3 inches of snow on the grass, forecasters say.
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The Twin Cities could get nearly an inch of rain Thursday as temperatures drop during the day, leaving the possibility for a little slush and snow. It was already snowing early Thursday in western parts of the state as the cold front moves in. Areas in the northern part of the state could get 2-3 inches of snow on the grass, forecasters say.

After highs in the 60s Wednesday, temperatures will dip to the 30s in most of the state by noon Thursday, WCCO reports.

The National Weather Service says: Rain and snow will stop at about 2 p.m. Thursday in the Twin Cities, with no snow accumulation expected in the Twin Cities. The temperature will fall to about 36 by 5 p.m. It'll also be windy Thursday, with gusts as high as 28 mph.

A bit of trivia from the Weather Service: Here's the top five snow accumulations for single daily snowfall recorded in Minnesota: 8.2 inches (1991); 5.5 inches (1905); 4.3 inches (1916); 3.7 inches (1959); 3.3 inches (1925).

Friday will be sunny with a high near 42 and low of 26, the weather service says.

The weekend will be partly cloudy with highs in the low 40s, KARE 11 says:

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