Wire taps may breed new mistrust between Somalis, government - Bring Me The News

Wire taps may breed new mistrust between Somalis, government

Taped phone calls are prosecutors' key evidence in the trial of two Minnesota women accused of funneling money to a Somali terrorist group. Some Somalis say use of the wire taps has set back efforts to build trust between government authorities and the community.
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Taped phone calls are prosecutors' key evidence in the trial of two Minnesota women accused of funneling money to a Somali terrorist group. Some Somalis say use of the wire taps has set back efforts to build trust between government authorities and the community.

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Prosecutors: Women discussed jihad on wiretaps

Prosecutors are basing their case on more than 80 phone calls, during which the two women from Rochester allegedly discussed funneling money to a terrorist group in Somalia. The two are accused of being part of a pipeline that sent money and fighters to al-Shabab.