Wisconsin might start selling booze as early as 6 a.m. - Bring Me The News

Wisconsin might start selling booze as early as 6 a.m.

Some lawmakers want to push back the time to help sports fans buy alcohol for tailgate parties. Under current law, stores can't start selling beer or liquor until 8 a.m.
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Some lawmakers want to push back the time to help sports fans buy alcohol for tailgate parties. Under current law, stores can't start selling beer or liquor until 8 a.m.

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