Wolf hunt: DNR reports more than 100 wolves killed in first eight days - Bring Me The News

Wolf hunt: DNR reports more than 100 wolves killed in first eight days

Minnesota hunters have killed at least 110 wolves in the first eight days of the state's highly controversial wolf hunt, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. The statewide quota for the early hunting season is 200 wolves, which runs through Nov. 18 or until hunters reach the limit.
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Minnesota hunters have killed at least 110 wolves in the first eight days of the state's highly controversial wolf hunt, according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. The statewide quota for the early hunting season is 200 wolves, which runs through Nov. 18 or until hunters reach the limit.

A second wolf hunting and trapping season begins on Nov. 24 and will also be capped at 200 for a combined total harvest of 400 wolves.

The Duluth News Tribune notes,wolf hunters and trappers in Wisconsin have taken 64 wolves through Sunday night.

This weekend, the advocacy group Howling for Wolves gathered on a Duluth street corner Saturday to call on Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton to end wolf hunting in the state.

Protesters have have failed several attempts to stop the hunt through legal action.

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