You can now pay-by-smartphone at all Minneapolis parking meters

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Motorists looking to park at any on-street meter in Minneapolis can now pay with a smartphone app from anywhere, instead of going to a pay station.

The program has been run on a limited basis since late summer, but is now available at all multi-space parking meters run by the city, the MplsParking website says.

The city's roughly 7,000 parking meters still accept quarters, dollar coins and most credit cards, but the MplsParking mobile payment smartphone app will make paying or adding time to meters more convenient for many.

How it works

Motorists can pay for on-street parking from just about anywhere that has cellphone service.

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All you have to do is download and register with the free mobile app (available in the Apple app store or through Google Play), and then when you park, enter the space number in the app and start the parking session.

The app has a countdown clock to let you know when your meter expires, and also sends an email when time is running low so you can add more time through the app if needed.

It also lets you find parking spots in the area, has a "find my car" function, and allows motorists to keep track of their time and transaction history, among other features.

Convenience will cost a little more

The convenience of the app will cost a little bit more than if you pay at the multi-stall payment station. Each transaction for a non-member costs 25 cents, while a preferred member (which costs 99 cents a month) will pay 15 cents per transaction.

The price of the actual meter will not change. (Check the city's website for meter rates here.)

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