Young adults aren't putting a ring on it – they're living with their parents

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More young Americans are living at home with their parents than alone, with a partner, or in any other living arrangement.

It's the first time that's been the case since 1880, according to Pew Research Center report released Tuesday.

In 2014, the report found 32.1 percent of young adults (ages 18-34) lived in their mom or dad's home, while 31.6 percent lived with a partner or spouse.

Meanwhile 14 percent lived alone, and 22 percent had some other living arrangement. (See table at right – click to enlarge.)

In 1940, an all-time high 35 percent of young people were living with their parents. But that same year, 62 percent of them were living with a partner or spouse.

Why the shift?

Well, it has a lot to do with marriage and people's changing attitudes.

Before 2014, the most common living arrangement for young adults was living with a spouse or partner in their own home.

But now, fewer people are choosing to settle down and get married before age 35, and Pew predicts one in four young adults will never get married.

But living with a partner unmarried hasn't replaced marriage, Pew found. Fewer people are choosing to live with a romantic partner too. And as a result, the number of young adults who are living with a spouse or significant other has fallen substantially since 1990.

This decline has pushed living at home with mom and dad to the top of the list of different types of living arrangements, Pew says.

The lack of desire to marry hasn't necessarily "caused" more people to live with their parents, Pew says.

"Other social and economic factors may have reduced the attractiveness of marriage for young adults and, at the same time, made living independently of parents more difficult."

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