Tough economy takes toll on young adults - Bring Me The News

Tough economy takes toll on young adults

Adults in their 20s and 30s race the highest unemployment numbers for their age group since World War II. There's little hope on the horizon. The recession officially ended in 2009, but new Census data show there are prolonged rates of joblessness with young adults causing them to delay marriage and put off having children. Poverty rates for their age group is higher than others.
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Adults in their 20s and 30s race the highest unemployment numbers for their age group since World War II. There's little hope on the horizon. The recession officially ended in 2009, but new Census data show there are prolonged rates of joblessness with young adults causing them to delay marriage and put off having children. Poverty rates for their age group is higher than others.

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