Young, minority voters turned out to defeat amendments

Early reports from election judges, pollsters and others on the front lines suggest that young people and people of color turned out in strong numbers in 2012 – as much as they did in 2008, when they enthusiastically embraced the first campaign of Barack Obama, the Pioneer Press reports. Those groups helped defeat two controversial constitutional amendments on the Minnesota ballot.
Author:
Publish date:

Early reports from election judges, pollsters and elections observers suggest that young people and people of color turned out in strong numbers in 2012 – as much as they did in 2008, when they enthusiastically embraced the first campaign of Barack Obama, the Pioneer Press reports. Those groups also likely helped defeat two controversial constitutional amendments on the Minnesota ballot.

Younger and minority voters – typically under-represented among voters – helped propel President Obama to an 8-point win in Minnesota.

How'd we vote? The Star Tribune has county-by-county maps that break down the presidential, U.S. Senate and amendment votes.

Next Up

Related

Stunner: Voter ID amendment fails

In a shocking upset, the voter ID amendment has failed, and by a sizable margin. With 98 percent of precincts reporting, the "no" votes led by nearly 8 percentage points, MPR says. The measure would have amended the state constitution to require voters to bring photo IDs to the polls.

Voter ID amendment advances at Capitol

Proposals for a constitutional amendment requiring photo IDs at polls are just a step away from reaching the House and Senate floors, MinnPost reports. Constitutional amendments, if approved by the Legislature, go straight to voters. They do not require Gov. Dayton's signature, so he cannot veto them.

Republicans introduce bill to implement voter ID through amendment

A group of Republican senators have introduced a bill that would have voters decide a controversial election reform measure this fall. Introducing a voter ID requirement as an amendment to the state constitution means the measure would bypass a threatened veto from Democratic Gov. Dayton.

Marriage amendment allies, foes target black voters

Black voters in Minnesota are the latest audience sought by opponents and supporters of marriage amendment, the Star Tribune reports. The president of the national NAACP was in the state Monday to urge black voters to reject the ballot measure that would ban gay marriage. Church leaders are divided.

Cash floods into amendment campaigns

In just the last three days, nearly $1 million has been funneled into the campaigns on both sides of the two constitutional amendments on Minnesota's Election Day ballot, the Star Tribune reports. Among the donations, the Minnesota Family Council gave $500,000 to the effort supporting the amendment that would effectively ban gay marriage.

Voter ID amendment headed for November ballot

Minnesotans will vote this fall on a Constitutional amendment that would make a photo ID a requirement to vote. The Republican-backed measure passed the Legislature on party-line votes. Now supporters and critics of the change will ramp up campaigns to influence the public.

Twin Cities mayors blast Voter ID amendment

Mayors R.T. Rybak of Minneapolis and Chirs Coleman of St. Paul say a requirement that Minnesotans show a photo ID to vote would drive up the costs of holding an election. They call the change an unfunded mandate and say it could force local governments to raise property taxes. The Minnesota Supreme Court is expected to rule soon on a lawsuit challenging the question slated to appear on the November ballot.