Your message here: more schools selling ad space to bring in money - Bring Me The News

Your message here: more schools selling ad space to bring in money

Hard-pressed schools are turning to selling ad space not just on their Web sites but on their walls, floors, and lockers. It's not for everyone, though. Says Fargo's superintendent "We don't want our schools looking like a minor league ball diamond."
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Hard-pressed schools are turning to selling ad space not just on their Web sites but on their walls, floors, and lockers. It's not for everyone, though. Says Fargo's superintendent "We don't want our schools looking like a minor league ball diamond."

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