Dayton puts chances of stadium bill passing at fifty percent

The long-awaited stadium bill will be filed at the Capitol Monday, but the governor thinks it's as likely to fail as pass. Mark Dayton says opponents of a new Vikings stadium are more outspoken right now than supporters are.
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The long-awaited stadium bill will be filed at the Capitol Monday, but the governor thinks it's as likely to fail as pass. Mark Dayton says opponents of a new Vikings stadium are more outspoken right now than supporters are.

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Dayton optimistic Vikings stadium bill will pass

The governor plans to spend his weekend persuading lawmakers to vote in favor of the stadium proposal next week. Gov. Mark Dayton told the Pioneer Press he predicts both chambers of the Legislature will approve the bill by a single vote. He said, "I've always thought it would pass by one vote."

50-50 chance Vikings stadium bill is approved

Gov. Mark Dayton, House Speaker Kurt Zellers and Vikings Vice President Lester Bagley were on WCCO Sunday morning to weigh in on the future of the Vikings stadium proposal. All three agree the stadium bill has a 50 percent chance of passing both chambers of the legislature before lawmakers plan to adjourn next Monday.

Stadium supporters plan stepped-up campaign this week

Governor Dayton will lead a public rally at the Capitol and may hold similar events elsewhere around the state. In addition, thousands of construction union members will lobby the Minneapolis city council to support a $975 million Vikings stadium in the city.

Dayton rejects GOP effort to tie stadium to business tax cut

A bill introduced by three Republican state senators ties a $300 state loan for a new Vikings stadium to a phase-out of business property taxes. They say it would generate more business contributions to a stadium effort. Gov. Mark Dayton says it would push up other kinds of property taxes and he will oppose it.

Dayton doubts latest plan to pay for Vikings stadium

Gov. Dayton said Monday that the latest proposal to cover the state's share of a new Vikings stadium would rely on a form of illegal gambling known as tip boards. "It doesn’t strike me at first glance as a viable option," he said at a Capitol press conference.