U of M has received more complaints since Norwood Teague resigned

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University of Minnesota president Eric Kaler has revealed as many as four additional complaints of sexual harassment by former athletics director Norwood Teague have been made since his resignation.

In an interview with MPR News Wednesday morning, Kaler said "less than five" complaints had been made since Teague resigned on Aug. 7, adding: "We're in the process of investigating those and we will ask the external counsel that we brought on board to also look into that."

Last week, the university announced it has hired Karen G. Schanfield of the Fredrikson & Byron law firm to conduct an outside investigation of the school's athletic department.

Teague resigned after complaints were submitted that he had sexually harassed two members of Kaler's senior executive team at a leadership retreat last month.

Following this revelation, Star Tribune basketball writer Amelia Rayno wrote in a column that she had also been the subject of harassment from Teague.

Details emerge about U of M's leadership retreat

Newly released documents provide a glimpse of the leadership retreat that led to Teague's resignation.

According to FOX 9, the retreat was held at Breezy Point from July 14-16 and came with a price tag to the university of nearly $10,000.

In addition to Teague and the two women who filed sexual harassment complaints against him, the retreat also included University President Eric Kaler, several vice presidents, chancellors and deans.

Here is the report on the investigation from FOX 9's Tom Lyden.

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The University issued a statement about the retreat Tuesday, noting leadership from across the system meet annually to discuss issues critical to the system as a whole.

"It's important for this group to spend focused, dedicated time together to tackle the University's mission- and strategic plan-driven goals and address collective challenges."

The news followed a report Monday that Teague didn't disclose to a search firm that he was the subject of a gender discrimination complaint while he was the AD at Virginia Commonwealth University.

That complaint was filed by VCU's women's basketball coach in 2012 and was settled by paying then-coach Beth Cunningham $125,000.

The search, which failed to discover the the complaint, was conducted by Parker Executive Search and cost the U of M $112,539, according to the Star Tribune.

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