Fans would shoulder more burden if Vikings use 'seat licenses' to fund stadium

"Seat licensing" is one financing option that not many people are talking about in the current debate, but it is an option. Fans would have to buy seat licenses then pay for game tickets separately. MPR explains the seat license usually comes with other benefits, like free parking, and fans are free to sell their license.
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"Seat licensing" is one financing option that not many people are talking about in the current debate, but it is an option. Fans would have to buy seat licenses then pay for game tickets separately. MPR explains the seat license usually comes with other benefits, like free parking, and fans are free to sell their license.

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Vikings consider seat licenses to fund new stadium

Minnesota Vikings season ticket holders recently received an e-mail survey from the team, asking if they would be willing to pay significant sums to secure the best seats in the new downtown stadium. The Star Tribune reports that selling personal seat licenses is one option the team is contemplating to raise cash. The Vikings' share of the construction cost is put at $975 million.

Gov. Dayton blasts Vikings' owners over seat licensing fees

Gov. Mark Dayton says he'll fight any effort by the Vikings to charge fans extra fees and threatens to undo the stadium deal. In a letter to Vikings' owners Zygi and Mark Wilf, Dayton says he strongly opposes asking season ticket holders to pay the "NFL Team/Private Contribution" for construction costs.

Vikings stadium contribution would include money from other sources

The Vikings' owners have said they'll pay more than $400 million toward the cost of a new stadium in Arden Hills. But the governor's top stadium adviser says that total includes a loan from the NFL and revenue from the sale of personal seat licenses. The owners would apparently pay no more than $225 million of their own money.

Minnesota charities concerned with pull-tabs funding Vikings stadium

More than 1,200 nonprofit groups generated about $80 million from paper pull-tab games in 2009. The Pioneer Press reports the state Department of Revenue predicts electronic pull-tabs would produce $72 million in new tax money. Charities are told they'll benefit from a significant tax relief, but the amount remains uncertain because it's still unclear how much of that $72 million will be needed to help finance a new NFL stadium in Minnesota.

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