Jared Allen: Hazing in the NFL is a 'rite of passage'

Author:
Publish date:

If you ask Jared Allen, hazing in the NFL isn't what it used to be.

"From a player’s standpoint, I think some of the younger guys come in and there’s a sense of entitlement, and you lose that work ethic, you lose that true veteran-led locker room sometimes," Allen said, via the Star Tribune. "You got to know who you’re dealing with. You can’t treat everyone the same. You can’t treat every rookie the same. Some guys are more sensitive than others, but it’s a sign of respect."

Vikings head coach Leslie Frazier has a limited hazing policy that players have to follow. Vikings' rookies are hazed by making coffee runs and doing other intern-like jobs. Veterans like Allen aren't allowed to instill fear by threatening rookies.

Threatening doesn't begin to describe what Miami Dolphins offensive lineman Richie Incognito has allegedly done. He's been suspended indefinitely for hazing fellow lineman Jonathan Martin to the point that Martin left the team. ESPN provided a transcription of a threatening voicemail Incognito reportedly left for Martin. You can click the link for the transcript, but note that it is graphic and potentially offensive.

Allen happens to know Incognito.

"Richie has a good heart, he really does," Allen said. "I know he's catching some heat right now, but from what I know of Richie, we've always had a good relationship. He's always been cool with my family. We have mutual friends, so it's a bad deal."

The Pioneer Press provided another quote from Allen on Incognito.

"Again, I don't know the details, so I can't comment on it, but either way you look at it, it sucks for the kid involved who felt he had to leave an organization and it sucks for Richie, he's out of the organization right now, and it sucks for the team because neither of them are playing football right now. So sometimes things can go a little too far, I guess. And this is what you've got to deal with."

Next Up

Related