Minneapolis house becomes historic landmark

The Minneapolis City Council has officially designated a 1904 Shingle-style house near the corner of Lake Street and 5th Avenue South as a historic landmark, the latest of about 150 buildings in the city to win the distinction.
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The Minneapolis City Council has officially designated a 1904 Shingle-style house as a historic landmark, the latest of about 150 buildings in the city to receive the distinction.

The city's Heritage Preservation Commission recommended the designation based on the home's Shingle-style design and the work of master builder Maurice Schumacher and master architect William Kenyon, MinnPost noted.

Schumacher came to the Twin Cities at age 19 from a Wisconsin dairy farm with a new pair of overalls and $10, MinnPost notes. He went on to be involved in the building of the Foshay Tower, the Northwestern Bell Telephone Co. building downtown and Vincent Hall at the University of Minnesota. There's more interesting history and photos in the 41-page designation study on the house on 5th Avenue South, near the corner of Lake Street.

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Maurice Schumacher, circa 1929

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