Top 5 districts that were most, least supportive of marriage amendment - Bring Me The News

Top 5 districts that were most, least supportive of marriage amendment

Which pockets of Minnesota were most and least supportive of the marriage amendment? You can probably make pretty good guesses about both lists, cobbled together by TheColu.mn, an online magazine for the LGBT community. Then again, you might be surprised. Do you live in any of these 10?
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Which pockets of Minnesota were most and least supportive of the marriage amendment? You can probably make pretty good guesses about both lists, cobbled together (with district maps) by TheColu.mn, an online magazine for the LGBT community.

Click here for maps to see if you live in any of five most or least supportive of the amendment.

The most supportive of the marriage amendment were districts: 22A, 22B, 9A, 9B and 18B.

The least supportive: 61A, 61B, 64A, 62B, 63A.

How'd your neighbors vote? For a complete list of districts and how they voted on the amendment, check this page on the secretary of state's website. You'll need to know which Legislative district you live in – click here to find that out.

The marriage amendment was defeated by Minnesota voters on Tuesday. It would have created a constitutional amendment that defined marriage as between a man and a woman, effectively banning gay marriage in the state.

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