Vikings don't use franchise tag

The deadline to apply the franchise tag to players in the NFL passed on Monday, and the Minnesota Vikings declined to use the tag. A couple of big name players who otherwise could have been free-agents, were tagged. Among them: Patriots wide receiver Wes Welker, Chiefs wide receiver Dwayne Bowe and Titans safety Michael Griffin.
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The deadline to apply the franchise tag to players in the NFL passed on Monday, and the Minnesota Vikings declined to use the tag. A couple of big name players who otherwise could have been free-agents, were tagged. Among them: Patriots wide receiver Wes Welker, Chiefs wide receiver Dwayne Bowe and Titans safety Michael Griffin.

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