Vikings stadium backers want to step around roadblocks in Minneapolis - Bring Me The News

Vikings stadium backers want to step around roadblocks in Minneapolis

Ted Mondale says new legislation would seek to nullify a city charter provision that requires voter approval before spending more than $10 million of city money on a sports facility, the Star Tribune reports. The newspaper says lawyers behind the stadium effort are also trying to find ways around a charter rule that requires nine City Council voters to sell city land.
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Ted Mondale says new legislation would seek to nullify a city charter provision that requires voter approval before spending more than $10 million of city money on a sports facility, the Star Tribune reports. The newspaper says lawyers behind the stadium effort are also trying to find ways around a charter rule that requires nine City Council voters to sell city land.

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