Vikings suggest using tax revenue from team to cover public share of stadium

Vikings leadership suggests the state should tap into revenue from sources like player's income taxes and taxes on fan purchases to pay for its share of the stadium. The team argues this revenue would not exist without the Vikings here in Minnesota.
Author:
Publish date:

Vikings leadership suggests the state should tap into revenue from sources like player's income taxes and taxes on fan purchases to pay for its share of the stadium. The team argues this revenue would not exist without the Vikings here in Minnesota.

Next Up

Related

Vikings stadium taxes worry charities

Charities that hoped the Vikings stadium deal would bring them tax relief now worry that they may actually wind up paying more. The deal contains several tax changes that charities had requested. But the overall tax structure, which favors charities using games with higher payout rates, concerns many.

Poll: Majority opposes taxes for stadium

The Taxpayers League of Minnesota on Wednesday said an unscientific poll suggests 55 percent of Minneapolis residents oppose using taxes to help fund a new Vikings stadium, with 27 percent in favor of the current Vikings stadium proposal. The league has been a vocal critic of the stadium funding plan.

Ramsey officials pitch new stadium tax idea

Ramsey County Commissioners Tony Bennett and Rafael Ortega have requested a meeting with state lawmakers to discuss a new Vikings stadium proposal, which would include a countywide 3 percent food, beverage and liquor tax.

Architecture bids in on Vikings stadium

Five national architectural and engineering firms have submitted renderings and plans for a new $975 million Vikings stadium. The finalists include Kansas City-based Populous, formerly known as HOK Sport, the company that designed new homes for the Minnesota Twins, Wild and University of Minnesota football team.

Ted Mondale to lead Vikings stadium authority

The newly created five-member Minnesota Sports Facility Authority, which will work with the Minnesota Vikings to oversee construction of a $975 million downtown Minneapolis football stadium, named Ted Mondale as its executive director. Mondale, who advocated on behalf of the Dayton administration for the stadium, will earn an annual salary of $157,181.

Vikings stadium at "4th and long"

Media outlets around the state are suggesting that it will be an uphill battle for a new Vikings stadium to get approved this session after there were little to no developments on it Thursday at the capitol. The most recent bill appears to be hung up in the Senate tax committee.